Civic Education Policies: State Profile

Civic Education Policies: State Profile - Connecticut

December 2016


Data are collected using publicly available state statute, administrative code and, in some cases, curriculum and standards frameworks. A profile was sent to each state for review and modification, as needed.


Description Citation/Link
Civics, Citizenship or Social Studies High School Graduation Requirements
Are there high school graduation requirement in civics or citizenship education? 3 credits required in social studies including at least 0.5-credit course in civics and American government. Conn. Gen. Stat. §10-221a
Civics, Citizenship or Social Studies Standards and Curriculum Frameworks
State standards include civics or citizenship education The Connecticut Elementary and Secondary Social Studies Frameworks (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) include a strand of standards for civics. Civics is a “discipline of focus” in grades Kindergarten-4th and again in high-school through a one semester American Government course requirement. Civics is woven into the curriculum, even in grades where it is not a “discipline of focus.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: applying civic virtues when participating in school settings (grades K-4), explaining specific roles played by citizens (such as voters, jurors, taxpayers, members of the armed forces, petitioners, protesters, and officeholders) (grades 6 and 7), and evaluating citizens’ and institutions’ effectiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level (high school Civics and Government).
Connecticut Elementary and Secondary Social Studies Frameworks (2015)

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/board/ssframeworks.pdf
Curriculum frameworks include civics or citizenship education The Connecticut Elementary and Secondary Social Studies Frameworks is a two-in-one document that provides the grade-level standards and considerations for curriculum.

Sample content examples in the framework include understanding: why it is important to be an active participant in the communities in which students belong (grade 1), how regions with participatory governments differ from those without (grades 6 and 7), and what it means to be a good citizen (high school).
Connecticut Elementary and Secondary Social Studies Frameworks (2015)

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/board/ssframeworks.pdf
Civics, Citizenship or Social Studies Inclusion in Assessment and Accountability Systems
State assessments include civics, citizenship education or social studies N/A 10-14n and http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/cwp/view.asp?a=2748&Q=334726
State accountability system includes civics, citizenship education or social studies N/A §10-223e
Civics, Citizenship or Social Studies Addressed in Other State Statutes or Administrative Code
State statutes (laws) that address civics, citizenship education or social studies 20 credits required for graduation, including a 0.5-credit course in civics and American government. Also allows local school boards to offer 0.5 credit in community service which may qualify for high school graduation. The service must include fifty hours of service and ten hours of related classroom instruction.
The prescribed course of study in the public schools includes "social studies, including, but not limited to, citizenship, economics, geography, government and history."

Public Act No. 03-54 establishes an official statewide student voter registration drive between January 1 and May 31. Public Act No. 03-108 allows students age 16 or 17 to work at polling places as checkers, translators and voting machine tenders.
164 Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-16b

Conn. Gen. Stat. § 10-221a
State administrative code addressed civics, citizenship education or social studies N/A

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