Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile

Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile - Florida


This information was collected from statutes, state board regulations and state education agency Web sites and was fully updated in 2016. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303.299.3689 or jzinth@ecs.org with questions regarding state policies on this issue.
 

Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, each high school must offer an IB Program, an Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) Program, or a combination of at least 4 courses in dual enrollment or AP, including one course each in English, math, science, and social studies. To meet this requirement, school districts may provide courses through virtual instruction, if the virtual course significantly integrates postsecondary level content for which a student may earn college credit, as determined by the department of education, and for which a standardized end-of-course assessment, as approved by the department, is administered.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. For every student in each AP course who scores ≥ 3 on the prior year's exam, a district is calculated a .16 full-time equivalent (FTE) student membership, to be added to the to the total FTE student membership for grades 9-12 for the subsequent fiscal year. Each district must allocate at least 80% of the funds provided to the district for AP instruction to the high school that generates the funds.

The school district must distribute to each classroom teacher who provided AP instruction:
1. A $50 bonus for each student taught by the AP teacher in each AP course who receives a score of ≥ 3 on the AP exam.
2. An additional bonus of $500 to each AP teacher in a school designated with a grade of “D” or “F” who has at least one student scoring ≥ 3 on the AP exam, regardless of the number of classes taught or of the number of students scoring a ≥ 3 or higher on the AP exam.

Bonuses awarded to a teacher according to these provisions not exceed $2,000 in any given school year. However, the maximum bonus is $3,000 if at least 50% of the students enrolled in a teacher's course earn a score of ≥ 3 on the exam in a school with a grade of “A,” “B,” or “C” or if at least 25% of the students enrolled in a teacher's course earn a score of ≥ 3 on the exam in a school with a grade of “D” or “F.” Bonuses awarded under these provisions are in addition to any regular wage or other bonus the teacher received or is scheduled to receive. For such courses, the teacher must earn an additional bonus of $50 for each student who has a qualifying score up to the maximum of $3,000 in any given school year.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. In calculating a high school's school grade, a school earns up to 100 points based on the percentage of graduates from the graduation rate who were eligible to earn college and career credit through AP exams, International Baccalaureate examinations, dual enrollment courses, or Advanced International Certificate of Education examinations; or who, at any time during high school, earned national industry certification identified in the CAPE Industry Certification Funding List.

In addition, each district identified as high-performing must submit an annual report to the state board and the legislature that includes the number and percentage of students taking an AP exam, and longitudinal performance of students who take an AP exam by demographic group (specifically, age, gender, race, and Hispanic origin, and by participation in the National School Lunch Program).

A district school board may operate an innovation school of technology for the purpose of developing the innovative use of industry-leading technology while requiring high student academic achievement and accountability in exchange for flexibility and exemption from specified statutes and rules. Similarly to high-performing districts, the school district of an innovation school of technology must submit a report to the state board and legislative leadership the number and percentage of students who take an AP exam, and longitudinal performance for students who take an AP exam, organized by age, gender, and race, and for students who participate in the National School Lunch Program.

Further, the department of education must develop an evaluation method for each provider of part-time virtual instruction that includes the percentage of students taking AP exams, and percentage of students scoring ≥ 3 on an AP exam.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The Florida Partnership for Minority and Underrepresented Student Achievement program offers AP teacher training to those specific, targeted districts and schools served by the Partnership each year. Program funding does not include every school and all districts. The program provides teachers of AP or other advanced courses with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success on AP or other advanced course exams and mastery of postsecondary course content.

The partnership must annually submit to the department a report that contains an evaluation of the effectiveness of the delivered services and activities. The evaluation must include the number of middle and high school teachers trained, and the effectiveness of the training.
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $53 for all but AP Research and AP Seminar exams in spring 2016, after College Board grants are applied. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $100 for each AP Research and AP Seminar Exam in spring 2016.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. Statute directs the levels of postsecondary education to collaborate in further developing and providing articulated programs in which students can proceed toward their educational objectives as rapidly as their circumstances permit. Time-shortened programs, as well as the use of acceleration mechanisms, must include AP.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Florida Virtual School, the country’s first statewide Internet-based public high school, offers AP courses.

Subject to a legislative appropriation, all public high schools administer the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT), or ACT Aspire to all 10th grade students (parents may exempt their children from taking the PSAT/NMSQT or ACT Aspire). Test results provide each high school with a database of student assessment data that certified school counselors use to identify students who are prepared or who need additional work to be prepared to enroll and be successful in AP courses or other advanced high school courses.

The Florida Partnership for Minority and Underrepresented Student Achievement must additionally: 
  • Provide professional development to middle school teachers and administrators that will enable them to educate middle school students at the level necessary to prepare the students to enter high school ready to participate in advanced courses.
  • Provide assessment of individual strengths and weaknesses as related to potential success in AP or other advanced courses and readiness for college.
  • Provide a plan for communication and coordination of efforts with the Florida Virtual School's provision of online AP or other advanced courses.
  • Work with school districts to identify minority and underrepresented students for participation in AP or other advanced courses.
  • Work with school districts to provide information to students and parents that explains available opportunities for students to take AP and other advanced courses and that explains enrollment procedures that students must follow to enroll in such courses. 
  • Provide information to students, parents, teachers, counselors, administrators, districts, Florida College System institutions, and state universities regarding PSAT/NMSQT or ACT Aspire, including the value of student scores in predicting the probability of success on AP or other advanced course exams.
The partnership must submit to the department a report that contains an evaluation of the effectiveness of the delivered services and activities. Activities and services must be evaluated on their effectiveness at raising student achievement and increasing the number of AP or other advanced course exams in low-performing middle and high schools, including measures of postsecondary readiness of the students affected by the program.

Each high school must advise each student of courses through which a high school student can earn college credit, including AP.

Each middle grade student's personalized academic and career plan must inform students of available opportunities to earn college credit in high school, including via AP.

At the beginning of each school year, districts must notify parents of students in or entering high school of the opportunity and benefits of AP, IB, Advanced International Certificate of Education, dual enrollment, and Florida Virtual School courses and options for early graduation.

To facilitate meaningful parent and family involvement, the department of education must develop guidelines for a parent guide to successful student achievement which describes what parents need to know about their child's educational progress and how they can help their child to succeed in school. The guidelines must include opportunities for parents to learn about rigorous academic programs that may be available for their child, including AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. The department of education must annually publish the minimum scores, maximum credit, and course or courses for which credit is to be awarded for each AP exam.  The department shall use student performance data in subsequent postsecondary courses to determine the appropriate examination scores and courses for which credit is to be granted. Minimum scores may vary by subject area based on available performance data. In addition, the department shall identify such courses in the general education core curriculum of each state university and Florida College System institution.

The specific courses for which students receive such credit must be identified in the statewide articulation agreement.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics Dependent children of active duty military personnel who otherwise meet the eligibility criteria for special academic programs, including AP, offered through public schools must be given first preference for admission to such programs even if the program is being offered through a public school other than the school to which the student would generally be assigned. If such a program is offered through a public school other than the school to which the student would generally be assigned, the student's parent must assume responsibility for transporting the student to that school.

© 2021 by the Education Commission of the States (ECS). All rights reserved. ECS is the only nationwide, nonpartisan interstate compact devoted to education. 700 Broadway #810, Denver, CO 80203-3442

To request permission to excerpt part of this publication, either in print or electronically, please contact the Education Commission of the States’ Communications Department at 303.299.3636 or mzatynski@ecs.org.

Your Education Policy Team  www.ecs.org