Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile

Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile - Indiana


This information was collected from statutes, state board regulations and state education agency Web sites and was fully updated in 2016. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303.299.3689 or jzinth@ecs.org with questions regarding state policies on this issue.
 

Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP Yes. Each high school must provide at least two AP and two dual credit course offerings.

In addition, each school corporation must provide AP science and math courses to qualified students.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Money appropriated to the department of education to implement the AP program may be used to:
  • Pay school corporations for instructional materials needed for a math or science advanced course
  • Pay for or rent equipment that a school corporation may need to develop a math or science advanced course
  • Pay costs incurred in implementing the AP program for the subjects other than math and science.
The department must establish guidelines for the distribution of these funds, including guidelines to ensure that money is distributed as evenly as possible throughout Indiana. In establishing these distribution guidelines, the department must consider the following factors:
  • The number of students and teachers participating in the program
  • Even geographic representation
  • Financial need of students participating in the program
  • Any other factor affecting the distribution of funds.
The department may give priority in the distribution of funds to a school that serves a high concentration of low income students.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability and reporting. Accountability: A school's college and career readiness achievement score is the product of the college and career readiness achievement rate and the state college and career readiness factor. A school's college and career readiness achievement rate is based on the percentage of students in the school's 4-year graduation cohort who accomplished any of the following:
  • Passed an AP exam with a score of 3, 4, or 5
  • Passed an IB exam with a score of 4, 5, 6, or 7
  • Earned 3 college credits via a dual credit/dual enrollment course
  • Obtained an industry-recognized credential
Reporting: Each school corporation's annual performance report must include the percentage of students taking an AP exam, and percentage scoring 3, 4, and 5 on the exam. 

In addition, the department of education must prepare an annual report on the implementation of the AP program. The report must include the pertinent details of the program, including:
  • The number of students participating in the program.
  • The number of teachers attending a summer institute offered by the College Board.
  • Recent trends in the field of advanced placement.
  • The distribution of money under this program.
  • Gender and minority participation.
  • Other pertinent matters.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Money appropriated to the department of education to implement the AP program may be used to pay stipends for teachers assigned to teach a math or science advanced course to attend College Board summer training institutes.

For a teacher to be eligible for a stipend, the training must:
  • Provide AP and pre-AP teachers with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and other advanced courses
  • Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that enables them to create strong and effective AP programs in their schools
  • Provide middle school, junior high, and high school teachers with AP vertical team training and other pre-AP professional development that prepares students for AP success
  • Support the implementation of an instructional program for students in grades 6-12 that provides an integrated set of instructional materials, diagnostic assessments, and teacher professional development in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college.
An annual report by the department of education to the state board on AP program implementation must include the number of teachers attending a summer institute offered by the College Board.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. The Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) covers the full exam fee for English, math, and science AP exams taken by 11th and 12th grade Indiana students enrolled in the corresponding course offered by accredited public and nonpublic schools. These exams include: Biology; Calculus AB; Calculus BC; Chemistry; Environmental Science; Computer Science A; Physics 1; Physics 2; Physics C, Electricity & Magnetism); Physics C, Mechanics; Statistics; English Language and Composition; and English Literature and Composition.

In addition, AP exam fees are not to be charged low-income students. According to a department memo, the federal 2015 AP Test Fee Grant will be utilized to cover most of this cost for non-math or-science AP exams taken by eligible students, and state funds will be used to cover the remainder.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. The state board may approve AP courses offered by a state educational institution in collaboration with a school corporation if the institution and school corporation demonstrate to the state board that the particular AP course satisfies the objectives of AP statutes.

In addition, statute directs the department of education and the commission for higher education to work with each state educational institution on implementing and communicating the state educational institution's policy for awarding AP credits for minimum scores.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Stipends are available for pre-AP teachers to participate in College Board summer training institutes. For a teacher to be eligible for a stipend, the training must: 
  • Provide pre-AP teachers with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and other advanced courses.
  • Provide middle school, junior high, and high school teachers with AP vertical team training and other pre-AP professional development that prepares students for AP success.
  • Support the implementation of an instructional program for students in grades 6-12 that provides an integrated set of instructional materials, diagnostic assessments, and teacher professional development in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college.
The department of education must develop and provide each public middle, junior high, and high school with AP curriculum guidelines. The guidelines must include a plan for increasing the (1) availability of AP programs in schools with a high concentration of low-income students; and (2) participation of low-income students in AP programsthrough information dissemination through print, electronic, and broadcast media that informs parents and students of the importance of AP and pre-AP courses to a student's ability to gain access to and to succeed in postsecondary education.

In addition, the department of education must establish guidelines for the distribution of certain funds to pay AP math and science exam fees, teacher training, instructional material and other course start-up costs, including guidelines to ensure that money is distributed as evenly as possible throughout Indiana. In establishing these distribution guidelines, the department must consider the following factors:
  • The number of students and teachers participating in the program
  • Even geographic representation
  • Financial need of students participating in the program
  • Any other factor affecting the distribution of funds.
The department may give priority in the distribution of funds to a school that serves a high concentration of low-income students.

A school corporation may provide a supplemental payment to a teacher in excess of the salary specified in the school corporation's compensation plan if the teacher teaches an AP course.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. All public postsecondary institutions must award credit for scores of ≥ 3. However, an institution may require a score higher than 3 on an AP exam if the credit is to be used for meeting a course requirement for a particular major at the institution.

In addition, statute directs the department of education and the commission for higher education to work with each state educational institution on implementing and communicating the state educational institution's policy for awarding AP credits for minimum scores.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit
Unique characteristics A student who earns a score of ≥ 3 on an AP exam is entitled to receive a certificate of achievement.

Before the end of grade 9, each student must further develop the graduation plan developed in grade 6. The updated graduation plan must indicate assessments (other than ISTEP and the graduation examination) that the student plans to take voluntarily during grades 10-12, including any AP exams.

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