Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile

Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile - Kentucky


This information was collected from statutes, state board regulations and state education agency Web sites and was fully updated in 2016. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303.299.3689 or jzinth@ecs.org with questions regarding state policies on this issue.
 

Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, all high schools must offer AP, IB, dual enrollment, or dual credit courses.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Statute defines “advanced science and mathematics” to mean AP biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics, and IB biology, chemistry, computer science, environmental systems, mathematical studies, further mathematics, and physics. The department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the High School Advanced Science and Mathematics Course Start-up Program. The program is to increase the number of students who successfully complete rigorous science and math coursework during high school by providing support to high schools to offer additional advanced science and math courses with highly trained teachers and appropriate course materials.

The program provides 2-year grants to high schools. To qualify for a grant, a school must initiate at least 1 advanced math and science course. During the first year of the grant, funds must be used for planning and the training of teachers. During the second year of the grant, funds must be used to provide additional support for implementation of an advanced science and math course. Permissible uses of funds include additional training for an advanced science and math teacher and the purchase of classroom supplies, textbooks, laboratory equipment, and other instructional materials.

A high school applying for a grant must provide assurances that:
  • All teachers of AP advanced science and mathematics courses supported by the grant will participate in a College Board-endorsed AP summer training institute, as available; and
  • All students completing AP courses supported by the grant will take the related AP exam.
Further, the department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the Middle School Mathematics and Science Scholars Program, which is intended to increase the number of students entering high school who are well-prepared to undertake rigorous mathematics and science coursework, culminating in successful completion of advanced science and mathematics courses and high achievement on AP and IB exams. The program must provide 2-year renewable grants to middle schools to support intensive, accelerated student learning in math and the sciences, to be offered at no cost to participants. Grants must be used to support activities that may include but not be limited to programs during the school day, after-school programs, Saturday programs, or multiweek summer sessions.

The grant application must ensure that participating teachers have the skills to provide intensive, accelerated student learning in math or the sciences and that they will receive ongoing, relevant professional development. A recipient middle school must collaborate with its feeder elementary schools, and with high schools to which it sends students, to:
  • Share information on grant activities
  • Strengthen alignment of curricula, content-knowledge expectations, and instructional practice between schools
  • Provide relevant professional development opportunities.
The accelerated learning program must include strategies to improve the academic skills in math and science for all students for whom significant academic achievement gaps have been identified and to attract them into higher level math and science courses. Specific activities must be conducted to recruit and enroll students from all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups in the school. Each grant applicant must provide assurances that the necessary resources will be allocated and utilized to help students in all subpopulations academically succeed in the accelerated learning program and to meet the enrollment goal (specifically, that the number of students representing each racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic group enrolled in the mathematics and science accelerated learning program is not less than nor limited to the percentage of each group in the total school population).

Statute directs the department of education, upon receipt of adequate federal funding, to: 
  • Identify, in conjunction with the council on postsecondary education, resources at the secondary and postsecondary levels that can be directed toward AP instruction
  • Compare the costs of offering AP courses through traditional on-site instruction, the Kentucky Virtual High School, and other methods and offer each school district assistance, if requested, in analyzing how the school district can most cost-effectively offer the largest number of AP courses
  • Identify current and future funding sources for AP programs and the amount of funds available or anticipated from those sources.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. School report cards must report, disaggregated by race, gender, disability and economic status:
  • AP courses offered
  • The number of students enrolled, completing, and taking the exam for each course
  • The percentage of examinees receiving a score of ≥ 3 on the AP exam.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Upon receipt of adequate federal funding, the department of education must:
  • Expand AP teacher training institutes, including offering AP teacher training instruction and assistance through the Kentucky Virtual High School or in conjunction with the Council on Postsecondary Education through the Kentucky Virtual University
  • Require teachers who are planning to participate in AP teacher training and complete AP training at AP institutes facilitated by the department to sign an agreement to teach at least 1 AP course in a Kentucky public school or the Kentucky Virtual High School when assigned by the school principal.
Regulation requires all high schools to establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to AP courses. The policy must provide for the assignment to AP courses teachers certified in the appropriate content area and prepared through professional development to teach the AP course.

In addition, statute defines “advanced science and mathematics” to mean AP biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics, and IB biology, chemistry, computer science, environmental systems, mathematical studies, further mathematics, and physics. The department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the High School Advanced Science and Mathematics Course Start-up Program. 

The program is to increase the number of students who successfully complete rigorous science and math coursework during high school by providing support to high schools to offer additional advanced science and math courses with highly trained teachers and appropriate course materials.

The program provides 2-year grants to high schools. During the first year of the grant, funds must be used for planning and the training of teachers. Additional permissible uses of funds include additional training for an advanced science and math teacher. A high school applying for a grant must provide assurances that all teachers of AP advanced science and mathematics courses supported by the grant will participate in a College Board-endorsed AP summer training institute, as available.

Further, the department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the Middle School Mathematics and Science Scholars Program, which is intended to increase the number of students entering high school who are well-prepared to undertake rigorous mathematics and science coursework, culminating in successful completion of advanced science and mathematics courses and high achievement on AP and IB exams. The grant application must ensure that participating teachers have the skills to provide intensive, accelerated student learning in math or the sciences and that they will receive ongoing, relevant professional development.

Statute directs the state board to make long-term and annual statewide goals concerning STEM disciplines and AP/IB course participation, including the number of teachers successfully completing a College Board-endorsed AP summer training institute, and the number of teachers with the knowledge and training needed to prepare students for high achievement on AP exams in advanced science and math (defined in statute as AP biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics).
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. One of the purposes of the science and mathematics advancement fund is to pay public school students' fees for AP exams in math and science.

However, for free and reduced-price lunch students not covered by the science and mathematics advancement fund, the student's school and/or district pays the $15 not covered by federal and College Board grants and school waiver of school exam rebate. Students should not pay the $15 fee.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores Yes, for supplement to the Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES). The Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA) is directed to provide a supplemental award for achievement on AP exams for an eligible high school student whose family was eligible for free or reduced-price lunch for any year during high school enrollment. The supplemental award for AP exam scores are:
  • $200 for each score of 3
  • $250 for each score of 4
  • $300 for each score of 5.
In addition, high schools are required to annually report to KHEEA by June 30 a compiled list of all high school students during the academic year, including family eligibility status for free or reduced-price lunch, and each AP exam score. Based on these and other reported data, KHEEA must notify each 12th grader of his/her final Kentucky educational excellence scholarship and supplemental award, including based on AP exam scores.
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. Statute directs the department of education, upon receipt of adequate federal funding, to:
  • Offer AP teacher training either through the Kentucky Virtual High School or in conjunction with the council on postsecondary education through the Kentucky Virtual University
  • Identify, in conjunction with the council on postsecondary education, resources at the secondary and postsecondary levels that can be directed toward AP.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Kentucky Department of Education must make information available to middle and high schools on the prerequisite content necessary for success in AP courses. The department must provide sample syllabi, instructional resources, and instructional supports for teachers that will assist in preparing students for more rigorous coursework. Instructional supports must include professional development for assisting students enrolled in the Kentucky Virtual High School or other virtual learning settings.

Each secondary school-based decision making council must establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to AP courses that recognizes that all students have the right to participate in a rigorous and academically challenging curriculum. All students who are willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum must be admitted to AP courses, including AP courses offered through the Kentucky Virtual High School, if they have successfully completed the prerequisite coursework or have otherwise demonstrated mastery of the prerequisite content knowledge and skills as determined by measurable standards. If a school does not offer an AP course in a particular subject area, the school must permit a qualified student to enroll in the AP course offered by the Kentucky Virtual High School.

In addition, each high school school-based decision making council, or the principal if none exists, must establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to AP courses. The policy must:
  • Provide equitable access for AP course participation for all students using either or both on-site instruction or electronic instruction, including the Kentucky Virtual High School
  • Provide for sharing information with all students through the individual graduation plan process and other means regarding the benefits of taking AP courses and AP exams including the potential for earning college credit
  • Establish an equitable process for recruiting underrepresented students in AP courses, including:
    • Racial minorities
    • Students with limited English proficiency
    • Students who qualify for free and reduced lunch
    • Students with disabilities
    • Males or females
  • Provide for the assignment to AP courses teachers certified in the appropriate content area and prepared through professional development to teach the AP course.
A student whose scores on the grade 10 college readiness exam or grade 11 college admissions exam indicate a high degree of readiness for college must be counseled to enroll in accelerated courses (including but not limited to AP courses).

The science and mathematics advancement fund is established to provide incentives for public schools to provide or expand student access to rigorous science and mathematics curricula, including AP courses in biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics. Funds may be used for teacher training, course materials, and scholarships for high school students to take advanced science and mathematics courses through the Kentucky Virtual High School when those courses are not offered at the school in which they are enrolled, among other purposes.

In addition, the department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the Middle School Mathematics and Science Scholars Program, which is intended to increase the number of students entering high school who are well-prepared to undertake rigorous mathematics and science coursework, culminating in successful completion of advanced science and mathematics courses and high achievement on AP and IB exams. The program must provide 2-year renewable grants to middle schools to support intensive, accelerated student learning in math and the sciences, to be offered at no cost to participants. Grants must be used to support activities that may include but not be limited to programs during the school day, after-school programs, Saturday programs, or multiweek summer sessions.

The grant application must ensure that participating teachers have the skills to provide intensive, accelerated student learning in math or the sciences and that they will receive ongoing, relevant professional development. A recipient middle school must collaborate with its feeder elementary schools, and with high schools to which it sends students, to:
  • Share information on grant activities
  • Strengthen alignment of curricula, content-knowledge expectations, and instructional practice between schools
  • Provide relevant professional development opportunities.
The accelerated learning program must include strategies to improve the academic skills in math and science for all students for whom significant academic achievement gaps have been identified and to attract them into higher level math and science courses. Specific activities must be conducted to recruit and enroll students from all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups in the school. Each grant applicant must provide assurances that the necessary resources will be allocated and utilized to help students in all subpopulations academically succeed in the accelerated learning program and to meet the enrollment goal (specifically, that the number of students representing each racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic group enrolled in the mathematics and science accelerated learning program is not less than nor limited to the percentage of each group in the total school population).

Statute directs the state board to make long-term and annual goals related to STEM and advanced coursetaking in math and science, including, among others: 
  • The number of high schools providing rigorous curricula and making available accelerated classes and college credit for students
  • The number and percentage of students enrolled in and completing AP courses by content area
  • The number and percentage of students whose families are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch receiving a score of ≥ 3 on AP exams
Statute directs the department of education, upon receipt of adequate federal funding, to develop the Kentucky Virtual Advanced Placement Academy which must offer school districts and their students access to a core AP curriculum through the Kentucky Virtual High School.

The Barren Academy of Virtual and Expanded Learning (BAVEL), a public school recognized by the Kentucky Department of Education, offers AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. Public postsecondary institutions must grant academic credit for scores of ≥ 3 on AP exams. Institution-level policies must specify whether the institution will grant academic credit toward the requirements of a major, program, or degree. Policies must also state which AP exams will be accepted toward academic credit toward a major, program or degree, and the minimum score on the AP exam for granting the academic credit toward a major, program or degree.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No. However, a high school applying for a grant under the High School Advanced Science and Mathematics Course Start-up Program, which supports costs associated with planning, teacher training and materials costs to expand AP course access in math and science, must provide assurances that all students completing AP courses supported by the grant will take the AP exam related to the course.
Unique characteristics Statute directs the state board to make long-term and annual statewide goals concerning STEM disciplines and AP/IB course participation, including:
  • The number of high schools providing rigorous curricula and making available accelerated classes and college credit for students
  • The number and percentage of students enrolled in and completing AP courses by content area
  • The number and percentage of students taking the AP exams in advanced science and math (defined in statute as biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics)
  • The number and percentage of students receiving a score of ≥ 3 on the AP exams in advanced science and math
  • The number and percentage of students whose families are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch receiving a score of ≥ 3 on AP exams
  • The number of teachers successfully completing a College Board-endorsed AP summer training institute
  • The number of teachers with the knowledge and training needed to prepare students for high achievement on AP exams in advanced science and math
  • Other criteria determined by the board.

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