Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile

Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile - Minnesota


This information was collected from statutes, state board regulations and state education agency Web sites and was fully updated in 2016. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303.299.3689 or jzinth@ecs.org with questions regarding state policies on this issue.
 

Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. The state has a competitive grant program for districts and charter schools to expand access to AP and pre-AP programs. Program funds may be used to purchase books and supplies, among other purposes.

In addition, any group of districts or a consolidated district that meets specified criteria may apply for an incentive grant for construction of a new facility or for remodeling and improving an existing facility. For an applicant group of districts, an education program must be developed that provides for more learning opportunities and course offerings, including the offering of AP courses, for students than is currently available in any single member district.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. Accountability reports must include a rigorous coursework measure indicating the number and percentage of high school graduates in the most recent school year who successfully completed one or more AP courses.

In addition, the commissioner must annually submit the following information on rigorous course taking, disaggregated by student subgroup, school district, and postsecondary institution, to the education committees of the legislature:
  • The number of pupils enrolled in AP courses in each school district
  • The number of teachers in each district attending College Board training programs 
  • The number of teachers in each district participating in support programs
  • Recent trends in the field of AP programs
  • Expenditures related to AP courses and programs
  • Other recommendations for AP programs in the state.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The state has a competitive grant program for districts and charter schools to expand access to AP and pre-AP programs. Program funds may be used to provide teacher training and instruction to more effectively serve students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, who participate in pre-AP or AP courses.

The state may pay a portion of the tuition, room, board, and out-of-state travel costs a teacher or other interested educator incurs in participating in an AP training program. The commissioner of education must determine application procedures and deadlines, select teachers and other interested educators to participate in the training program, and determine the payment process and amount of the subsidy. The procedures determined by the commissioner must, to the extent possible, ensure that AP courses become available in all parts of the state and that a variety of course offerings are available in districts. 

In practice, a 2015 legislative appropriation allows applicant Minnesota teachers attending a summer 2016 in-state training at Carleton College and/or Augsburg College to receive a scholarship of $500 for tuition and college credit, and an additional $150 for room and board on campus. Teachers may apply for an out-of-state AP training scholarship of up to $900 if the AP course the teacher needs is not available at Carleton or Augsburg, the 2016 training dates pose a conflict, or the teacher attended Augsburg or Carleton training in 2015.

In addition, the commissioner must provide support programs during the school year for teachers who attended the training programs and experienced AP teachers. The support programs must provide teachers with opportunities to share instructional ideas with other teachers. The state may pay the costs of participating in the support programs, including substitute teachers, if necessary, and program affiliation costs.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. By statute, the state must pay exam fees for low-income public and non-public school students, and to the extent of the appropriation, pay a portion or all of the exam fees for other public and nonpublic students. Low-income students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $0 in spring 2016 after state, federal, and College Board grants are applied. After a $40 Minnesota Department of Education reimbursement, non-low-income students will pay $43 or $52 in spring 2016, depending on whether their school waives the $9 school rebate.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The state has a competitive grant program for districts and charter schools to expand access to AP and pre-AP programs. To be eligible to participate, a 3-year plan approved by the local school board must seeks to achieve one or more of the following goals:
  • Increase the availability of and all students' access to AP courses
  • Expand the breadth of AP courses available to students
  • Increase the number and the diversity of students participating and succeeding in AP courses
  • Provide low-income and other disadvantaged students with increased access to AP courses
  • Increase the number of high school students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, who receive college credit by successfully completing AP courses and achieving satisfactory scores on related exams.
In reviewing applications, priority may be given an otherwise qualified applicant that demonstrates any of the following:
  • A focus on developing or expanding pre-AP or AP courses or increasing students' participation in, access to, or success with these courses, including the participation, access, or success of low-income and other disadvantaged students
  • A compelling need for access to pre-AP or AP courses
  • An effective ability to actively involve local business and community organizations in student activities integral to pre-AP and AP courses
  • Access to additional public or nonpublic funds or in-kind contributions available for pre-AP or AP courses
  • An intent to implement activities that target low-income and other disadvantaged students.
The commissioner must award grants on an equitable geographical basis to the extent feasible. Grant awards must not exceed the lesser of $85 times the number of pupils enrolled at the participating sites on October 1 of the previous fiscal year, or the approved supplemental expenditures based on the budget submitted in the district or charter school's proposal. 

Program funding must be used, consistent with the application for any of the following purposes:
  • Provide teacher training and instruction to more effectively serve students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, who participate in pre-AP or AP courses
  • Further develop pre-AP or AP courses
  • Improve the transition between grade levels to better prepare students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, for succeeding in pre-AP or AP courses
  • Purchase books and supplies
  • Pay course fees
  • Increase students' participation in and success with pre-AP or AP courses or programs
  • Expand students' access to pre-AP or AP courses through online learning
  • Hire appropriately licensed personnel to teach additional AP courses
  • Engage in other activity directly related to expanding students' access to, participation in, and success with pre-AP or AP courses, including low-income and other disadvantaged students.
Each recipient district or charter school must:
  • Collect demographic and other student data to measure the extent to which the district or charter school raised students' academic achievement. These data must be reported to the commissioner, who must annually make summary data about this program available to the education policy and finance committees of the legislature.
  • Annually report to the commissioner its actual expenditures for AP and pre-AP courses. The report must demonstrate that the district or charter school has maintained its effort from other sources for AP and pre-AP courses compared with the previous fiscal year, and the district or charter school has expended all grant funds, consistent with its approved budget.
In addition, procedures for disbursing AP teacher training funds overseen by the commissioner must, to the extent possible, ensure that AP courses become available in all parts of the state and that a variety of course offerings are available in school districts.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No. Minnesota State Colleges and Universities must award credit for an AP exam score of ≥ 3. The University of Minnesota is encouraged to but not required to award college credit for AP scores of ≥ 3.

2015 H.F. 1 directed the chancellor of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities to  submit to the K–12 and higher education legislative committees a report by February 1, 2016 describing how to standardize AP exam course equivalencies across all state colleges and universities.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics

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