Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile

Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile - Nevada


This information was collected from statutes, state board regulations and state education agency Web sites and was fully updated in 2016. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303.299.3689 or jzinth@ecs.org with questions regarding state policies on this issue.
 

Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. 2015 S.B. 515 appropriates $3 million in fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and $5 milllion in FY 2016-17 for a college and career readiness competitive grant program. A portion of these funds are intended to support establishing new AP programs or expanding existing programs, with a focus on underserved populations in rural and urban Nevada. Applicants must use these funds for one or more of specified activities, including:
  • Development of adequate programming infrastructure (hardware, software) to improve student access to virtual learning.
  • Funding for additional books and materials for AP course work.
  • Developing a rigorous curriculum.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. Nevada's "College and Career Readiness" indicator ranks high schools on a scale from 0 to 4 points based on several indicators, including the percent of students passing AP courses. 
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. 2015 S.B. 515 appropriates $3 million in fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and $5 milllion in FY 2016-17 for a college and career readiness competitive grant program. A portion of these funds are intended to support establishing new AP programs or expanding existing programs, with a focus on underserved populations in rural and urban Nevada. $200,000 of the $662,750 in funds available for the 2016-17 school year must be used to provide professional development for AP teachers. Grantees' budgets should include costs associated with College Board-sponsored trainings. Grantees will use this portion of the fund for one or more of the following:
  • In collaboration with the College Board, an AP summit in fall 2016 to train administrators, first-time and experienced teachers in districts
  • Providing professional development for teachers to conduct and support virtual learning for AP courses.
  • Provide administrators and teachers with resources and a support system that will help them to build capacity for expanding AP courses as well as increase the number of students participating and succeeding in AP courses.
  • Providing staff release time for professional development and addressing the expenses associated with attendance at the College Board conferences.
The RFP also provides that, in collaboration with the College Board, the state will host a two-day rural summit in fall 2016 to train administrators, first-time, and experienced teachers, and teachers in rural districts. The state will also host a statewide Summer Institute training program in June 2017 for all AP teachers. Note that the only grantee expenses related to these activities are those associated with teacher travel.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. 2015 S.B. 515 appropriates $3 million in fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and $5 milllion in FY 2016-17 for a college and career readiness competitive grant program. A portion of these funds are intended to support establishing new AP programs or expanding existing programs, with a focus on underserved populations in rural and urban Nevada. $273,750 of these funds are earmarked to pay test fees as well as increase participation for an additional 3,000 students. Funds may be used to pay for test fees for additional students or supplement the federal AP Test Fee program for low-income students.

Independent of these grant funds, students who qualify for a fee reduction under the federal AP test fee program will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Each school district must prepare a written notice of all the AP and other advanced courses available to students in the district. The notice must: 
  • Specify where those courses are available within the school district
  • Identify the grade level of students for which those courses are available
  • Be posted on the district website.
Each public school must:
  • Prepare a written notice that identifies the courses identified by the district notice that are available at that school
  • Post a notice in one or more conspicuous places at the school indicating the availability and location of a complete list of the courses available in the school district and at that school
  • Ensure that the notices are made available to parents of students in the school
    • At the beginning of each school year or upon a pupil's enrollment in the school, including at meetings of parent organizations at the school and by distribution with other information sent home with students
    • At parent-teacher conferences.
2015 S.B. 515 appropriates $3 million in fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and $5 milllion in FY 2016-17 for a college and career readiness competitive grant program. Of this appropriation, $662,750 is available for the 2016-17 school year to support the AP component of the grant. Such grant funds are to support establishing new AP programs or expanding existing programs, with a focus on underserved populations in rural and urban Nevada. Applicants must use these funds for one or more of the following activities, among others:
  • Funding for online courses to assist students enrolled in AP courses.
  • An outline of the current status of the high school’s AP program, including the number of AP courses offered, as well as a plan to establish or expand these AP programs.
  • A plan for identifying and recruiting students with a high potential for success in AP programs.
  • A proposal that is designed to increase the number of underrepresented students who participate in AP courses and take the respective exams.
  • A plan to create opportunities to increase the number of African American and American Indian students’ participating in AP programs by 100%.
  • A proposal for establishing online and blended instruction in rural areas that experience difficulties accessing qualified AP teachers.
  • Development of the AP program in rural settings to ensure that every rural high school will offer a minimum of three AP courses.
Of this $662,750, $64,000 of these grant funds is earmarked for increasing the number of African American and American Indian students participating in AP courses and exams by 100%.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes, effective with the 2016-2017 academic year. AP scores of ≥ 3 must be accepted for credit to satisfy electives, general education requirements, or major requirements. Each institution must publish its AP exam score course granting policy in its course catalog and on its website before the beginning of the 2016-2017 academic year.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics Each student's 4-year academic plan developed in grade 9 may include the Advanced Placement courses available to the student that will assist the student in the advancement of his/her education.

One of the means by which a student may demonstrate competency in lieu of seat time is by performance on an Advanced Placement exam in the subject area of the course.

When developing an individualized education program (IEP) for a student with a hearing impairment, the IEP team must consider the provision of academic instruction, school services and direct access to all components of the educational process,including AP courses.

Fees deposited in an education savings account may be used to pay for AP exam fees.

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