Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile

Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile - Washington


This information was collected from statutes, state board regulations and state education agency Web sites and was fully updated in 2016. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303.299.3689 or jzinth@ecs.org with questions regarding state policies on this issue.
 

Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program is intended to enhance access to dual credit courses, including AP courses. One-half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction on a competitive basis to provide one-time grants for high schools to expand the availability of dual credit courses. Funds may be used to support AP curriculum development, technology, and textbook fees, among other purposes.

The other half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction to districts as an incentive award for each student who earned dual high school and college credit (including by earning a ≥ 3 on an AP exam) via a course offered by the district during the previous school year. Districts must distribute the award to the high schools that generated the funds. The award amount for low-income students eligible to participate in the federal free and reduced-price meals program who earn dual credits must be set at 125% of the base award for other students. A student who earns more than one dual credit in the same school year counts only once for the purposes of the incentive award. If a high school provides access to online courses for students to earn dual high school and college credit at no cost to the student, such a course is considered to be offered by the high school.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability and reporting. Accountability: The "Career and College Readiness" performance indicator includes the percent of students earning high school credit in a dual credit program or earning a state or nationally recognized industry certification for all students group and targeted subgroups. "Dual credit" is defined to include AP, IB, Running Start, College in the High School, Tech Prep, and other courses intended to give students advanced credit toward career pathways or degrees. 

Reporting: Accountability report cards indicate the rates at which students earn college credit through a dual credit course, including by earning a score of ≥ 3 on an AP exam.

The office of the superintendent of public instruction must also annually report to the education and higher education committees of the legislature on student participation rates and academic performance in dual credit programs, including AP.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program is intended to enhance access to dual credit courses, including AP courses. One-half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction on a competitive basis to provide one-time grants for high schools to expand the availability of dual credit courses. Funds may be used to support AP teacher training, among other purposes.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program is intended to enhance access to dual credit courses, including AP courses. One-half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction on a competitive basis to provide one-time grants for high schools to expand the availability of dual credit courses. Funds may be used to support exam fees.

Low-income students whose schools are not involved in the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program will pay $15 per exam in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The superintendent of public instruction must notify high schools and any other public school serving 9th graders of the names and contact information of public and private entities offering programs leading to college credit, including information about online AP classes, if the superintendent has knowledge of such entities and if the cost of reporting these entities is minimal. Each senior high school and any other public school serving 9th graders must annually provide each parent of a student in grades 9-12 with information on the entrance requirements and the availability of local programs that lead to college credit, including classes such as AP. The information may be included with other information the school regularly mails to parents. In addition, each high school and any other public school serving 9th graders must enclose the names and contact information of other public or private entities offering such programs, including online AP programs, to its grade 9-12 students if the school has knowledge of such entities.

The office of the superintendent of public instruction must compile and post on the office website information about online learning programs for high school students to earn college credit, including via AP courses. Examples of information to be compiled and placed on the website include links to purveyors of online learning programs, comparisons among various types of programs regarding costs or awarding of credit, advantages and disadvantages of online learning programs, and other general assistance and guidance for students, teachers, and counselors in selecting and considering online learning programs. High schools must ensure that teachers and counselors have information about online learning programs for high school students to earn college credit and are able to assist parents and students in accessing the information. High schools must ensure that parents and students have opportunities to learn about online learning programs under these provisions.

In addition, Insight School of Washington offers a variety of AP courses.

Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program is intended to enhance access to dual credit courses, including AP courses. One-half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction on a competitive basis to provide one-time grants for high schools to expand the availability of dual credit courses. To be eligible for a grant, a district must have adopted an academic acceleration policy. In making grant awards, the office of the superintendent of public instruction must give priority to grants for high schools with a high proportion of low-income students and high schools seeking to develop new capacity for dual credit courses rather than proposing marginal expansion of current capacity.

The office of the superintendent of public instruction must annually report information to the education policy committees and the fiscal committees of the legislature about the demographics of the students earning dual credits in the schools receiving grants for the prior school year. Demographic data must be disaggregated by White, Black, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian, Pacific Islander/Hawaiian Native, low income, transitional bilingual, migrant, special education, and students covered by section 504 of the federal rehabilitation act of 1973.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. Every two years, the institutions of higher education must collaboratively develop a master list of postsecondary courses that can be fulfilled by achieving benchmark scores on AP or other recognized college-level proficiency exams. Courses on the master list fulfill lower division general education requirements or postseondary career and technical education requirements. From the master list, each institution must create and publish a list of its courses that can be satisfied by successful proficiency exam scores. The requirements to develop a master list do not apply if an institution has a clearly published policy of awarding credit for AP or other recognized college-level placement exams and does not require those credits to meet specific course requirements but generally applies those credits towards degree requirements.

In addition, each institution of higher education, in designing its certificate, technical degree program, two-year academic transfer program, or first-year student and sophomore courses of a baccalaureate program, must recognize the equivalencies of at least one year of course credit and maximize the application of the credits toward lower division general education requirements that can be earned through successfully demonstrating proficiency on exams, including AP exams. To the extent possible, institutions must agree on examination qualifying scores and demonstrated competencies for the credits or courses under subsection (3) of this section, with scores equivalent to qualified or well-qualified. Nothing in this subsection shall prevent an institution of higher education from adopting policies using higher scores for additional purposes.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics The office of the superintendent of public instruction must provide professional development, technical assistance, and guidance for school districts to develop career and technical course equivalencies that also qualify as AP courses.

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